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"Bring Your Brave” Campaign is Helping Young Women Through Education

In 2015, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention started their own campaign to raise awareness for breast cancer. Bring Your Brave allows young women to share their stories about breast cancer. All stories are wither about “prevention, risk, family history and survivorship” according to the CDC. The campaign’s main goal is encourage women, through the art of story telling, to ask their doctor about their breast cancer risks.

 

Since “breast cancer is the most common cancer among women in the United States” it is important for women to be informed. The CDC estimates that 1 in 8 women will get breast cancer in their lives. Young women are most at risk since their cause of breast cancer is most likely hereditary. Since some women are not informed about the disease, it sometimes won’t be caught until it is too late.

You know your body best. When Meagan noticed a pea-size lump in her breast, she went to her health care provider to check it out. This Breast Cancer Awareness Month listen to your body and pay attention if something doesn't feel right. Meagan's story: http://bit.ly/MeaganBYB

262 Likes, 7 Comments - Centers for Disease Control (@cdcgov) on Instagram: "You know your body best. When Meagan noticed a pea-size lump in her breast, she went to her health..."

The campaign’s target audience is women between the ages of 18 to 44. The website stated that women who have a “family history and background [that] predispose them to a higher risk for breast cancer at a young age.” The risks are if you have a family history of breast cancer or ovarian cancer and if you are an Ashkenazi Jewish woman.

CDC on Twitter

A breastfeeding benefit you may not have known? It can reduce your risk of #BreastCancer. https://t.co/6zutGB9OTv #BringYourBrave

Through this campaign, they are hoping to educate women on the risks of breast cancer before it is too late. The CDC would like to also encourage younger women to share their health providers certain concerns. Lastly, they want women to know more about breast health and how to continue a healthy lifestyle.

 

If you would like to be a part of the campaign or spread their message, there is a resource page on the CDC’s website. On the page, you can watch videos about breast cancer risks, prevention and risk management as well as infographics. They also would like to encourage everyone to post either to their Facebook or Twitter pages about this group’s movement. If more people are involved, more women can be saved!

Sarah is a Hufflepuff living in NYC. When she is not traveling or talking to random animals, she is working as a script writer. Tweet her at @lumpyspacederp